I’ve been spend­ing a lot of time in the health­care world for obvi­ous rea­sons, and have been immers­ing myself with knowl­edge from all angles. One of the more fas­ci­nat­ing angles is the cross sec­tion of health­care and design. Here’s a cou­ple of my favourite findings:

1) Cut­ting for Stone by Abra­ham Verghese

It’s been a while since I’ve read a work of fic­tion and I was highly rec­om­mended this book by my Acu­men Fund col­leagues. I fin­ished this book over the week­end and was so cap­tured by the story, out­raged on behalf of the pro­tag­o­nist, delighted by the inten­sity, and over­all over­whelmed at how beau­ti­fully writ­ten this book was. It’s a story that takes place from Ethiopia to New York, about love, med­i­cine and the inter­twin­ing of fate.

We are all fix­ing what is bro­ken. It is the task of a life­time. We’ll leave much unfin­ished for the next generation

- Cut­ting for Stone, A. Verghese

2) Butaro Hos­pi­tal in Rwanda 

When you look at East Africa’s health­care land­scape, Rwanda stands out as a med­ical suc­cess. Health indi­ca­tors have improved on all counts since the geno­cide, all pri­mar­ily due to the suc­cess of a uni­ver­sal health insur­ance, where the poor­est 25% of Rwan­dans get free med­ical care. One of my favourite things about the Rwan­dan health­care land­scape is a hos­pi­tal, Butaro hos­pi­tal that was designed by MASS Design Group The hos­pi­tal has no hall­ways, so patients can’t gather in close spaces, and the air in the wards are changed more than 12 times per hour to pre­vent patients from being infected by other patients — par­tic­u­larly, with multi-drug-resistant TB.

Image taken from: Arch­Daily by Iwan Baan

3) Future of health­care is Social - Fast Company 

I recently was in Tan­za­nia attend­ing and speak­ing at a mobile health con­fer­ence orga­nized by USAID and the MIn­istry of Health of Tan­za­nia. The theme at hand was the increas­ing tech­nol­ogy and mobile pen­e­tra­tion that is chang­ing the health land­scape in Africa. There are over 500 mhealth projects deployed around the world with the major­ity of projects (over 30%) being in Africa. I really enjoyed this arti­cle by Fast Com­pany on the increas­ing social nature that comes along with the increased tech­nol­ogy pres­ence in health­care. Also worth read­ing is another arti­cle by Fast Com­pany, on 5 steps to design­ing a bet­ter health­care sys­tem.

4)  Design for trust - UX Magazine 

Good design isn’t beau­ti­ful. Good design builds trust. As an investor, when I eval­u­ate health­care inter­ven­tions, I look to see how the ser­vice accounts for fac­tors that mat­ter to a person’s dig­nity: they way they are being treated, train­ing of health­care staff and acces­si­bil­ity of infor­ma­tion. This is espe­cially impor­tant when deal­ing with the poor, who are used to being mar­gin­al­ized, and not receiv­ing proper ser­vice. The arti­cle is more web-based trust, but rel­e­vant nev­er­the­less, when think­ing about how you inter­act with a patient. At the end of the day, when receiv­ing med­ical news, every­one wants infor­ma­tion that is “cor­rect, com­plete and unbiased.”

7) Design­ing Hand­wash­ing — Core77

An older arti­cle, but a goodie in address­ing one the most fun­da­men­tal issues in health­care: Hand­wash­ing. A great read in explor­ing: Move­ment Design, Mus­cle mem­ory, move­ment scripts and fluidity.